The Baldrige Budget — Just the Facts Part II

Posted by Harry Hertz, the Baldrige Cheermudgeon

When I reported about the proposed fiscal year (FY) 2012 budget for the Baldrige Program in February 2011, Congress had not yet passed the FY 2011 budget. I want to update you on the current status. Congress is currently on their August recess and will be addressing the FY 2012 budget when they return in September. FY Budget2012 begins on October 1, 2011. The House Appropriations Committee has proposed zero funding for the Baldrige Program for FY 2012. The proposal must be voted on by the full House and then the Senate must vote on an appropriation. If there are differences between the two bills, a conference committee will beappointed to resolve the differences. When a final appropriations bill is passed by both Houses of Congress, it goes to the President for approval. As in 2011, until such time there is the potential for a continuing resolution to fund government programs.

With the potential for the House proposed bill becoming the final appropriation, the Baldrige Program, members of our stakeholder community, and the Baldrige Foundation are doing contingency planning. The Baldrige Foundation is committed to the sustainability of the Program, although the current endowment alone could fund the Program for only a few years. The Foundation officers have stated that they will ensure the completion of the Award cycle for all 2011 Award applicants, including site visits for those selected by the Judges in September and the judging process in November. Next they will turn their attention to working with Congress and long-term sustainability of the Program.

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11 Responses to The Baldrige Budget — Just the Facts Part II

  1. Mary Lange says:

    Thanks Harry for the update.
    With Congressional leaders at home for the recess, is there anything we can do from our localities/messages we can bring to our elected leaders, etc. Or, would you prefer that we wait and see. M

  2. Bryan Zak says:

    Perhaps Japan or another country will realize the importance of continuing the program. Hopefully, however Congressional leaders learn from recent events and get moving.

  3. jinzhu chen says:

    Thanks for your update.As a chinese I hope the question will be resolved soon.The MBA will be done better.

  4. Steve Guns says:

    Harry, this information is helpful. Thanks for sharing regarding the current status.

  5. Anil Kumar says:

    Harry, thanks for a timely & succinct update.

  6. A Sutton says:

    Thanks for the update; however, instead of thinking about cutting funds to the Program, hopefully, some one can explain to them the importance of using the program.

  7. Mary Lange asks a very important question – is there anything we can do from our localities/messages we can bring to our elected leaders, etc. Or, would you prefer that we wait and see?
    Speaking on behalf of the Board of Directors of the Baldrige Foundation we have been working with the the Alliance for Performance Excellence (State and Local Programs) and ASQ to get the attention of Congress, however, MORE VOICES are required – WAITING IS NOT AN OPTION. WE NEED EVERYONE’S HELP NOW! Later, unfortunately will be TOO LATE.
    I urge everyone who values this program to write their representative in Congress. ASQ has provided a link for “Congressional Support For the Baldrige Program” – where there is a sample letter for you to send. Please add whatever personal information you can to communicate your experience with the Baldrige Program to your Members of Congress. ASQ has provided a format but don’t hesitate to add a paragraph and personalize it so your letter stands out. Please note that some of the letters may be sent to ASQ’s Washington, D.C., representatives. When meeting with Members of Congress, it will be very effective to show the printed letters as a sign of strong support for Baldrige. Thanks for your involvement in such a unique and deserving program – link is
    http://wfc2.wiredforchange.com/o/8695/p/dia/action/public/?action_KEY=352
    We need everyone’s help now – thank you

  8. Paul (Jingwei) Tian says:

    Harry, many thanks for your updates.I have been a big fans of organization performance excellence and worked as quality award examiner for Shenzhen City, Guangzhou City, Dongguan City,Henan Province, and China, introduced it to my organiation and public.Malcolm Baldrige Performance Excellence Program is always the benchmark in the world,increasing local governments in China have set and funded goverment or mayor quality award to encourage organizations to pursue excellence,we’ve learned a lot from it. I strongly support you, Thom and others for the long-term sustainability of the program.

  9. Cynthia Woods says:

    It’s time Congress applied for a Baldrige award!

  10. Eric says:

    Did the fiscal commission make Baldrige a target? From their $200 Billion in Illustrative Savings:
    “21. Eliminate the Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership and the Baldrige National Quality Program. The Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership (HMEP) consists primarily of a network of nonprofit centers, partially funded by the federal government, which offer management and manufacturing advice to U.S. businesses. The Baldrige National Quality Program, for the most part, gives awards to companies for achievements in quality and performance. Those who support eliminating the programs suggest that the federal government shouldn’t be providing the services these programs provide, in part because similar programs are provided by the private sector. In fact, it is argued that some funding from HMEP supports inefficient companies that would otherwise go out of business. Also, businesses should already have enough incentives to maintain the quality of their products without awards from the Baldrige National Quality Program. Elimination of both programs would save over $120 million annually. Alternatively, the programs could be funded through fees charged to the beneficiaries.”
    As I recall, the intended beneficiaries of the Baldrige program were … Americans!
    Any suggestions for a polite critique of the quoted staffwork? My vocabulary fails me…

  11. Harry Hertz says:

    Eric,
    You provide me an opportunity for a polite comment! The Baldrige Program is a lot more than an award for manufacturers. The Prgram’s mission (seen on our home page) is to improve the competitiveness of US organizations. We are a national education program that is focused on the whole economy, businesses of all types and sizes, as well as education, health care, and nonprofits. Our main mission is to provide tools for all organizations to improve their performance. We also happen to run a competition for a Presidential award that identifies role models who educate other US organizations about their successful strategies. I hope more than the 2.5 million web page viewers who view our Criteria for Performance Excellence annually will avail themselves of this great education program and will spend a few minutes on our web site or talking to us to learn more.
    Thanks,
    Harry

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